Diamond Research - Page 6 of 7

Economic research into the global diamond industry. A thorough exploration of every aspect of the diamond market, from mining to consumer demand.

What is Diamond Research?

Diamond research is the comprehensive examination of the diamond industry. It may examine a single, very specific activity in the diamond sector. It could also study an inner industry interplay or provide long-term tracking of an industry component accompanied by an analysis that puts it in context. 

A research project may include market interviews, use of big-data analytics, expert analysis, and the use of exclusive granular data collected from various diamond industry sections.

Diamond pipeline activities that are researched include, but are not limited to, the following areas of the diamond market value chain:

  • Consumer buying habits,
  • Household expenditures,
  • Retailers’ purchasing and sales trends,
  • Manufacturers’ financing and polishing activities,
  • Rough diamond purchasing,
  • Diamond miners’ sales and capital investments,
  • Changes in diamond prices,
  • Trends and forces that impact pricing.

 Who Needs Diamond Research?

Every company involved in the diamond industry needs a deeper understanding of the market. Some want to better understand the supply chain and how it impacts them. Other companies are looking to discover their blind spots.

Frequently, companies need to ensure they are not missing out on opportunities. This may include hidden shortages, timely warnings of inventory buildup in the market, a need for a new service, or simply changing prices of a particular item.

Financial firms may be after diamond industry analysis to decipher trade figures or discover how a part of it works. These firms repeatedly find that it is challenging to talk with diamond companies and require someone to untangle diamond-speak. Most importantly, they need data placed in a broader context. 

Where is Diamond Research Used?

Before deciding on a strategy, in making marketing choices, when pricing goods, before picking a jewelry design for production, before launching a product, when tracking market changes, and much more.

For a deeper look into this topic, please see below.

“Less for More” Turns into “More for Less”

More for less diamond jewelry

After the 2008 financial crash, a De Beers research study found that consumers continued to spend during the holiday season, but more cautiously. They bought fewer items, yet were willing to spend more per item – if it had long lasting value. They called this trend “less for more,” and consumers were indeed willing to buy nice diamond jewelry items. …

Refusals, Strops, Contracts and Conspiracies – A Rough Market Review

Refusals, Strops, Prices, New Contracts and Conspiracies – A Rough Market Review

In a way, there were no surprises this past week, and that in itself should be a surprise. De Beers offered a large rough diamond supply to its clients – at slightly higher prices – and the market just could not digest it, leading to many refusals. Why did the miner offer so many goods in an overloaded market? Why …

Jewelry Purchases, the Education Factor

Jewelry Purchases, the Education Factor - Featured Edahn Golan

Because education is an important factor in creating the ability to generate higher earnings, it is not surprising that people that have not graduated from high school spent the least on fine jewelry purchases and watch buying when comparing expenditure by education. Based on the latest consumer expenditure survey of US households, those that have not graduated from college spent …

The US State of the Jewelry Market Report

US Market report jewelry diamonds consumer expenditure

Millennials spend more on jewelry than any other age group Age group between 25-34 spent 28% more than average household Consumers are buying more jewelry but at a lower price-per-piece Fine jewelry sales in the US reach $68.8 billion Watch sales reach $9.13 billion, increasing 7.7% Buying season spans throughout the year, with sales during traditional holiday season dropping 1.2% …

What Do The Weak Hong Kong Shows Say About Our Future?

Hong Kong Show weak, diamond prices current

There were very few smiling faces on the way out of the March Hong Kong trade show. The few people that did express a positive sentiment were either oblivious to the outcome of the shows or simply happy to see a familiar face they had not seen in a while. The social aspects of all trade shows are important, but …

Indian Diamond Companies Improve Cash Flow

IIJ Feb 2015

Diamond manufacturers adjusted their operations to the current low and declining loose diamond prices and high rough diamond prices. In the backdrop are fixed overhead costs and costly financing, according to traders.

De Beers Sales +11% in 2014

Rough diamond sorting - De Beers

Anglo American announced its results this morning and with it De Beers‘ results: Sales: $7.114 billion (+11%) Carats sold: 32.73 million carats (+5%) Underlying EBITDA: $1.818 bln CAPAX: $689 million Return on CAPEX: 15%   Highlights from the 2014 financial report: De Beers’ underlying EBIT increased by 36% to $1.4 billion (2013: $1.0 billion). The increase was due primarily to solid demand …

Japan’s Diamond Imports in 2014: Less for More

Japan's Diamond Imports in 2014: Less for More

Japan’s polished diamond imports edged up in 2014, however, the quantity of diamond imports by carat has declined, according to data recently released by the country’s ministry of finance. Japan is one of the world’s four largest diamond-jewelry consumer markets. In 2014, Japan’s gross polished diamond imports totaled $888.6 million, up 1.6% over the prior year. The average value of imports …

Specialty Jewelers’ Sales Tumble in November

Specialty Jewelers’ Sales Tumble in November 2014

November 2014 sales by specialty jewelers in the US declined 7.1% year-over-year to $2.73 billion, based on preliminary figures from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.